Call to Arms

Call to Arms – PentHouss

“Mirrors ring a claustrophobic space, fractalizing it into infinity. Lights flash. Enter the riot police. Obscured behind darkened face shields, they menace. And then they begin dancing. Conceived by London/Paris multidisciplinary collaboration PentHouss, Call to Arms blends movement, sound, light, and architecture in an immersive meditation on power, resistance, and control. Reacting to the crackdowns on people’s movements from the U.S. and the U.K. to Turkey and Hong Kong, where protests are met with overly-armored use of force, artists Anna Lann and Yonathan Trichter, curator and creative partner Helen Neven, and choreographer Ekin Bernay joined to mobilize a response.  

Call to Arms conveys the experience of political mobilization by appropriating the garb of the powerful themselves. The dancers in PentHouss’s performance skew the “us” versus “them” mentality the state profits on and challenge those who might steer clear of direct action to understand on-the-ground reality. By leveraging the uniform as costume and turning the synchronized movements of militarized police forces into a kind of dance, PentHouss exposes the theatrics inherent to such shows of force (what they refer to as “the instrumentalization of fear”).

PentHouss uses movement to evoke the power of physical solidarity and to show that, as its title suggests, modes of resistance remain. As PentHouss writes: “Movement is dance; movement is assembly; movement is a call to arms.””

[image and text copied from https://dis.art/call-to-arms%5D

Interior Scroll

© ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020

Interior Scroll – Carolee Schneemann

This print is one of several documentation works from Schneemann’s peformance in which she read aloud from a scroll of paper from her vagina.

Tate website: “Tate’s print comprises two black and white photographs of the artist on the table during the second part of the performance when she was withdrawing the scroll. A column of text on either side of the photographs elaborates the words written on the scroll. The text was taken from a super 8 film Schneemann had begun in 1973 entitled Kitch’s Last Meal. It recounts a conversation with ‘a structuralist film-maker’ in which the artist sets intuition and bodily processes, traditionally associated with ‘woman’, against traditionally ‘male’ notions of order and rationality.” (https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/schneemann-interior-scroll-p13282)

Medium: Beet juice, urine and coffee on screenprint on paper Date: 1975 Collection: Tate Dimensions: (image) 90,5 x 183cm

Fen Ma + Liuming’s Lunch I

Fen Ma + Liuming’s Lunch I – Ma Liuming

This photograph is a documentation of the performance Fen-Ma Liuming’s Lunch, by Chinese artist Ma Liuming.  The artist as an androgynous alter-ego, Fen-Ma Liuming, cooked fish in a steaming pot naked and silent. The fish was served to the audience. The remains of the fish were placed back into the pot, which the artist attached (with a tube) to his penis and began sucking and breathing at the other end. 

Medium: Photograph, gelatin silver print on paper Date: 1994 Collection: Tate Dimentions: 61 x 50,8cm